The Last 30 Seconds

Does your training show when it matters the most in a fight?

Watching MMA fights at all levels, we notice the athletes that are at peak speeds, strengths, sharpness, etc., during the first minute of the fight, right? But as the rounds move on and the time ticks down we notice these peaks can change for most. Even at the highest levels, one instance in lack of judgment, decrease in reaction time, or decrease in power of a kick or punch can lose the battle. That fighter loses not because the other fighter had more skill but because he wasn’t more mentally or physically prepared. These are crushing reasons to lose. In everyone’s eyes it is known that the outcome was preventable. What happened? Yes, fighters most of the time will use a loss to motivate them to train even harder for the next fight. The important question is, “What went wrong?” I believe when a fighter finally reaches an opponent that has equal or slightly more/less talent and conditioning, there is one thing that guarantees victory. “Training Carry Over”, how much of the preparation for the fight actually carries over into the ring with situations like fatigue that happen in the” last 30 seconds” of the fight or later rounds. This is also seen in the boxing world as well.

Stepping Outside Your Comfort Zone

Back in November 2010, I was invited by fitness icon Josie Gardiner to attend a charity event in Boston. The fundraiser was organized by the ECA World Fitness Alliance’s Boston Balance to
raise money for autism research, and would be in the form of a two-hour group exercise class called Zumba®. The event would highlight a slew of very talented dancers and fitness professionals including the host of this event, the fabulous Ann Saldi. I have to admit that my initial assumption of Zumba® was probably similar to that of many others, in which I formed an option solely based upon what I’d heard or seen in a brief 15 second glance. I remember saying to myself, it’s just dancing right? How much of a workout could it really be? We make assumptions when we don’t fully understand a situation. It’s a natural reaction to instantly fill in any missing information by making things up. We do this because we like to try to make sense of things rather quickly. However, as a fitness professional I pride myself in making sure that I gather all the information regarding the newest programming, classes and equipment. So, in short I needed more information!

Avoiding Fat Traps during Summer Travel

People train vigorously through the winter and spring preparing for the summer season. June 21 will be the first official day of summer and with it begins a period of travel and leisure for many families and individuals. It feels great when your perseverance and tenacity in training translates into a lean and healthy body. Unfortunately time spent traveling in cars, campers, and planes or the time spent in hotels can compromise all of your hard work and sacrifices you made preparing for summer. With a few considerations for summertime travel, you can still have a great time and stay in top shape.

Many of us will travel by car to our favorite destinations. Time spent on the road can reek havoc on your nutrition if you do not prepare in advance. Here are a few tips to consider when traveling on the road.

How To Become A Strength & Conditioning Coach

Being a strength & conditioning coach can be one of the most rewarding careers that exists. Here are three important areas to consider when trying to become one.
Part 1 – The Importance of Experience

From all the research I’ve done, people I’ve talked to, and my personal experience, I feel like one of the most important things you can do is to get as much experience as you can. It has to be understood that to be able to eventually get a job as a strength & conditioning coach, you will have to put in your time. It does not matter what degree you have, or what you know, If you don’t have any practical experience. Most, if not all of the time you put in to start out will be on a volunteer basis. Coaching experience of any kind is a plus, but obviously experience in a strength & conditioning environment is the most valuable. If you’re interested in getting into the field, then an internship is a great start. It will help you to realize if this is really what you want as a career, and it will get you going with experience. If it’s something you would like to try, don’t wait! The earlier you can get started and the more experience you can gain, the better. Most universities/colleges are willing to accept volunteer interns, as long as you are committed to working hard and learning. Contact the coaches at schools you’d be interested in helping out at and see if they’d be willing to take you on as an intern.

Training for Obstacle Course Races: Part II

Part II: Event Specific Training
Transmutation
Once you have your base in place, its time to enter the Transmutation phase. The time it takes to get through this and the level of difficulty you’ll want to include will depend entirely on your fitness level and the degree of difficulty of the race. For the Tough Mudder, we wanted to be able to cover a distance close to the eleven mile distance of the race combined with obstacle stations that would specifically improve our skills for the race. Notice I said skills and not strength. During the Transmutation phase, you are not going to get appreciably stronger. You will however, get much better at the skills you practice. For example, when we started our 8 week Transmutation phase for the Tough Mudder, I could climb the rope with someone holding the bottom of it and I could get over the six foot wall with a little help. By the end of the eight weeks, I could go up and down the rope easily and climb the eight foot wall by myself. Its not because I got stronger, its because I got more coordinated. Practice makes perfect.

Breaking the STIGMA of old school AEROBICS for male clients

One of your male clients is grabbing some H2O in between his sets and as he walks by the group exercise room he stops to watch for a few seconds. He looks in and sees a fairly large group of mainly women, who are basically moving around in a pretty dynamic manner. The music is bumpin’, people are sweating up a storm and his first reaction is: “I am never going in there”. Thinking by the time he walked out of this room, he would be wearing a purple head band, pink leg warmers and a pair of inappropriate short shorts…

This article is to help assist or encourage our typical male client who often hesitates or resists entering the group exercise room. Of course there are a variety of reasons or excuses that we have all heard in the past, but I truly believe that the basis of this issue stems largely from the 1970’s & 1980’s STIGMA that Jane Fonda and Richard Simmons pleasantly left behind. Now, I mean no disrespect to these two fitness guru’s that have helped to improve and shape (pun intended) this wonderful industry that I am grateful to call my profession. However, you can’t help but cringe or laugh a bit imagining these bright neon colored outfits that are often now seen at Halloween costume parties.

You Are What You Eat, Part 10: Seasoned Oils

Some of the most convenient, not to mention taste-enhancing items in a home kitchen are pre-blended oils and spices. They can be used on salads by themselves or to make salad dressings. Unless made with Flax or another Essential Fatty Acid blend, which are destroyed by high heat, they can be used to cook any number of dishes, from eggs to vegetables to meats.

Flax oil is very rich in Omega 3 fatty acids (“Fats That Heal, Fats That Kill,” page 283). Assuming that you don’t eat it to the exclusion of other oils and that you are eating your fair share of meat and other fats, a tablespoon or two of flax oil a day is probably to your benefit. Most of us have diets that are unbalanced between Omega 3 and Omega 6, i.e. we consume too many Omega 6’s, so this is one way to remedy the situation.

Seared Shrimp, Muscles & Scallop Pasta w/Lemon Chardonnay Butter Sauce

– 6oz Angel Hair or Linguini Pasta

– 6 Shrimp (any count size)
– 4 Green Lipped Mussels 6 Small Scallops
– 1 tsp Chopped Garlic
– 1 Lemon
– 2oz Grated Romano Cheese (or Parmesan)
– 4oz Chardonnay
– 1 Tbsp Olive Oil
– 2 Tbsp Butter
– Salt to taste
– Pepper to taste

Cook pasta according to package instructions.
Heat a sauté pan over medium heat and add olive oil.
Add the scallops and sear 2-3 minutes each side.
Add shrimp and garlic and heat 15-20 seconds or until the aroma from the garlic is noticeable.
Squeeze in the lemon juice and add mussels and Chardonnay. Cover with lid for 30-45 seconds or until the mussels are open.
Add butter, salt and pepper to season.
Add pasta and toss until pasta is hot then add Romano cheese to tighten sauce.
Heat 2-3 minutes until cheese melts and the sauce tightens.

Scaption for Functional and Stronger Shoulders

Did you know that the absence of working out consistently may result in injuries from everyday life activities such as sitting? This is because some muscles can become overactive due to a lack of exercise.

Here is one quick exercise that can functionally and aesthetically engage your shoulders to become stronger.  This is perfect for those with hectic lifestyles who are short on time to exercise.

Scaption is an excellent movement that employs your scapula and rhomboids that will functionally strengthen your rotator cuff specifically the supraspinatus. Scaption also creates shoulder mobility that will fortify your joints and tendons. By performing scaption, over time, you will become stronger in other pressing or lateral movements such as the bench press or front shoulder raise. Since scaption engages the scapula and rhomboids, if you have imperfect posture, this exercise can help develop appropriate strength in your middle back, yielding postural improvements and creating scapula retraction.

Pass the Salt

International Contributor from Bombay , India

So, tell me, who can resist a packet of salty crisps? Well, for starters, I can’t! Crisps, with a sprinkling of salt that gives that crunch and delicious tingle to the taste buds. Ummm. Aside from the fact that, the crisps are deep fried and high in fat and are simply scrumptious because of that, what exactly is it that gives the crisps and the other food we eat, the actual taste?

Well, it’s the salt . Salt is a gustatory delight. You’re probably wondering what’s with the salt we eat that is so significant to my health?

First let me give you a little background about salt. Most people probably think of salt as simply that white granular food seasoning found in a salt shaker on virtually every dining table, It is that, surely, but it is far more.

Browse

News collects all the stories you want to read