Returning to Golf after LBP: Restoring Your 
Client’s Drive without Reinjury

Background

Golf is a popular activity, particularly in the older population because it provides an opportunity to play a game that enables someone to socialize while truly enjoying the outdoors. Golf has become popular internationally, providing an activity with a low level of physical exertion over an extended period without the physical contact required in many other sports. It challenges the golfer to tackle variable obstacles in the golfer’s path such as bunkers, narrow fairways, winds and the most important goal, to drive the tiny white ball into the cup.

Injuries

Low back injuries are becoming more prevalent in the workplace, as well as in golfers.

Tee Time Talk

The first lesson I learned in golf fitness, I learned the hard way. I completed the Golf Fitness Trainer program sponsored by ISSA in the spring of 2002. The launch of my first program was scheduled for early summer. I worked at a golf resort and knew it would be a big hit. I put out a sign up sheet at my facility and was devastated when only 2 people signed up. I began asking around as to what I had done wrong. Did I have a poor marketing plan, not enough advertising, lack of name recognition? I had made friends with a young man who frequented our fitness center and had just turned pro. He confessed that he wanted to join my group but simply couldn’t afford to learn or try anything that might make him sore or cause him to reevaluate his swing while he was in high season. He urged me to reconsider offering this program again in the winter. This required a tremendous amount of patience to wait another 6 months for something I had worked so long for. I heeded his advice and it has paid off in spades. I launched my new and improved golf fitness program at a local private golf club and at the resort where I work. At my first public speaking engagement 50 avid golfers showed up. At the launch of my new golf school, my classes filled up and I am maintaining a wait list. They are already asking if I can offer a sequel to what they are learning. Here’s how we can help the off season golfer.

Training A Soccer Player: The Basics

Soccer, or football as it’s called outside of the States, is the number one sport in the world. Even in the US, soccer is the most played sport in the youth age bracket. With the growing emergence of professional soccer and the youth of yesterday playing more and more today, soccer conditioning is quickly becoming big business for trainers in the know. So how do you train a soccer player? Long distance running? Slow isolation movements in the gym? Quick short sprints? Plyometrics? The list of possibilities are endless, but the correct training protocol is not.

First, let’s look at how the game is played. A regular soccer match consists of two 45-minute halves with a 15-minute break in-between. Substitutions are less regular at the higher levels of play and like basketball, can only be made at the time the ball goes out of bounds. There are zero time outs for rest or strategy changing. The game also consists of four main position categories: forward (offense), halfback, fullback (defense), and a goalkeeper. It’s obvious to those who have played or watched a full match that different positions require different energy demands and body compositions in order to excel. Since the majority of the game is played without the ball, we will focus our discussion on training without possession and leave the ball skill up to the coaches.

The Whole In One Approach To Golf

Are you ready to take your golf game to a new level? Golf fitness and a whole body approach to your golf game may be the answer. Many of you have spent hours on the driving range sharpening your golf skills. You’ve invested a small fortune in new equipment, golf lessons, and accessories, yet you haven’t seen a decrease in your handicap in years. You’re not alone. Fifteen years ago the average handicap for women was 29. However, you may be surprised to learn it is the same number today. What accounts for this lack of improvement and what can we do about it?

The real answer lies in the basic understanding that what you are seeking cannot be purchased in a pro shop, from a local golf retailer or on-line store. The answer may be closer than you think because it lies within your current physical capabilities. The most overlooked component of improvement in golf is neglecting to factor in your physical conditioning. It is your physical capabilities that will determine your range of motion, level of consistency and potential for injury. It is the goal of every golfer to have better timing, control, accuracy and skill. If these factors can contribute to the execution of a golf swing with consistency, then you are well on your way to improved golf performance.

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