Visual Sensory Difficulties

The visual sense helps us see and detect objects.  Many trainers have worked with clients who are blind. Modifications can be made to make their fitness session successful such as helping them visualize in their mind the exercise, using physical prompts to secure safety in their routines, and creating an…

HEAVY WORK FOR OUR SPECIAL NEEDS POPULATION

As trainers, we are more than the persons who work with our clients one to three times a week, but we are also a resource for parents, teachers, and those who work with our clients.  Many children and teens benefit from exercise because it is heavy work.  Many activities we demonstrate in the gym can…

GERD Disease

Gastroesophageal reflux disease, also known as GERD, causes symptoms such as persistent heartburn and acid reflux. The chronic condition, which is caused by inflammation and dysfunctions in the stomach, affects nearly one in five American adults. GERD’s causes and risk factors include obesity, untreated food allergies, smoking, leaky gut syndrome, high-stress levels, indigestion,…

A Guide for Coaches and Trainers for Special Needs Clients Who Demonstrate Tantruming and Sensory Overload

Trainers and coaches have found a new opportunity when they work with the developmentally disabled, mentally challenged, and behavior challenged.  These youth and adults need fitness even more so than the average child or adult. And we trainers can work with a population that will show and benefit greatly from our expertise.  But the challenge…

Training ADHD and Autism Clients

Trainers and coaches have a fantastic opportunity to train a population that is passionate and ready for improving their daily life.  This population consists of youths, individuals, ADHD, and autistic participants.   ADHD Children, teens, and adults with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, often suffer from the inability to sit still. They squirm in their seats and are easily bored or distracted.

Zones of Regulation for Trainers and Teachers

Self-regulation refers to our ability to control our own thoughts, emotions, and behaviors in relation to our environment. Examples of self-regulation are resisting emotional outbursts when something upsets us, controlling impulses, calming down when someone feels worried or anxious, and transitioning from one task to another. Teachers and trainers can help children with special needs or emotional challenges. They can use the method of the zones of regulation to recognize and help their clients navigate their emotions in the gym classroom.

Behavior Regulation Tools for Autistic Clients

As trainers work with children and teens on the autism spectrum, it is very important that they work hand in hand with other caregivers.  Many of the effective tools they use can also be employed successfully in the fitness environment.

The tools show what behavior is to be expected in certain situations, visual aids to remind them of acceptable behavior and options shown to independently monitor their own behavior.

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