Sometimes, clients just wanna hang out.

Your principal role as a Fitness Professional for any client is to understand what they want. Which is actually a lot harder than it seems. “People don’t think what they feel, they don’t say what they think, and they don’t do what they say.” – David Ogilvy With this in…

Incorporating Moderate Exercise Into Your Busy Lifestyle

The average American is faced with a myriad of challenges in their daily lives with one of the most commonplace being their own health. Somewhere between juggling a demanding career with a loving, yet equally challenging family life, they have forgotten that their own well-being is dependent on healthy nutrition and regular exercise. Despite the Department of Health and Human Services recommends at least 50 minutes of moderate exercise a week, only approximately 23% of American adults meet these requirements according to the CDC.

Life Can Be A Zoo: A Guide for Stretching for Young Children

Stretching is important for any age especially children since their muscles and bones have not finished growing yet. Though injuries to children are more easily repaired than for adults, bone and ligament injuries never repaired as fully as healthy new muscle. Stretching is generally overlooked in children’s training programs yet children need to stretch for the same reasons as adults.

Hence the following animal poses designed to teach flexibility, strength, balance, concentration, and the importance of stretching, presented as a play, achieve the desired results.

The Role of Exercise in Stress Management

Life can be a constant challenge full of daily hurdles. Everyone has their own struggles. No one is immune from stress. While some stresses can actually lead to positive action, stress can be an absolute killer to us physically, mentally, and spiritually. It’s very easy to not want to move or exercise when feeling this constant negative tension. However, this is exactly what we must all do to reverse the adverse effects of stress: exercise. And, as fitness professionals, it’s vital to teach and provide proper guidance to our clients to move even when not with us. So, what’s the proper vernacular that the fitness professional should reiterate to their clients about stress and exercise? Moreover, how does the fitness professional inspire their clients to move especially when not in their company?  How does the need become greater than the want?

Lessons with a Ladder

The agility ladder is a great tool to use for training for children as well as inexpensive and easy to use.  Ladders can range from chalk drawings outside to using a dry erase marker, duct tape inside and sports tape inside a gym.  Kids love the equipment and they can easily shuffle, crawl, jump or hop through each rung as they practice their math facts, spelling words, grammar or multiple guess questions.

Artistic ABS- Flatter ABS in a Week

Every muscle and organ have its own function and task, but our core is the Queen of your body. It is the fundamental part of our body that keeps our posture upright, supports our back, keeps our immunity and keeps our major organs well intact. Basically, if you did not have a core you could not do 90% of things you are already doing, so begin loving your core.

Now that we all share something in common- abs, the question is who has the prettiest and best-designed abs? The way we train our abs can differentiate how our abs look like. For example, if you do heavy weight training you develop more of the 6 pack abs look. If you exercise holistically you will develop a more natural look.

The Physiological and Mechanical Tradeoff

As a personal trainer, one of the difficulties I often run into is trying to balance what a client can do with what they want to do.  Often times these situations will look like this:

Client: “I want to build my glutes.”

Me: “Okay, let’s add in some lunges today.”

Client: (During the first set) “Ouch, this is bothering my knee.”

I call this dilemma the physiological/mechanical tradeoff.  It’s a tradeoff because, as personal trainers, we know how we want to challenge our clients’ physiology, but we need to be able to do so within the mechanical parameters that are presented.

How do I keep my clients on track in the New Year and maintain their motivation?

It’s no secret that January is a busy month for the fitness industry. New Year’s resolutions are in full swing, motivation levels are at an all-time high, and clients are willing to do what it takes to reach their goals.  Then February comes… and more often than not, that fire that was lit inside of so many people seems to go away.

You may have even seen this happen with some of your clients in the past.  No matter what you do, they start off strong and then disappear. Of course, every client is different, so there could be a million reasons why this happens.  However, I am going to break down three of the most common reasons why New Year’s motivation is lost, based on my experiences, and how you can help your clients to push past those barriers.

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