Safe and Responsible Fitness Programming for the Postnatal Client

Working in the fitness world, I’m sure you’ve been approached by a new mom dying for you to help her get back into her pre-pregnancy skinny jeans.

We celebrate women who do amazing physical feats quickly after having a baby (running a marathon for example) without realizing we may be encouraging something that nature is not intending to happen so soon.

A woman getting her post-baby body toned and fit again is entirely possible.  The problem with women rushing to the gym too soon to get that “sick body” is that they often speed through a vital stage of healing.  It’s essential that the body have time to properly repair and strengthen muscles that go through immense changes through a pregnancy, namely the pelvic floor and transverse abdominals.  

The Medication You Want To Be Hooked On

WARNING: Side effects include more energy, a clear mind, enhanced quality of life, lowered stress, more smiles, and a killer physique!

According to Times Magazine, “Molecular biologists and neurologists have begun to show that exercise may alter brain chemistry in much the same way that antidepressant drugs do – regulating the key neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine.” It’s about time doctors get on board with one of the most powerful medications for depression: exercise. Not only can exercise work in the same way antidepressants do, but it also comes with positive side effects rather than negative ones.

Of course, there are those who really benefit and heal their depression using medication, however, there are also those, like myself, who try medications to heal depression and completely lose their personality while only getting a tiny bit less depressed. Instead of numbing your personality and just feeling “okay”, schedule yourself on a regular exercise regimen, put the work in, and feel absolutely enhanced and empowered.

5 Tips for Improving Posture in Your Classes (and a little science fun!)

“Stand up tall.”

“Shoulders up, back, and down.”

“Sit that butt down and back onto a chair”

How often do you find yourself saying these cues over and over in classes in order to “fix” your participant’s poor posture? Do you find yourself getting annoyed when you have said it for the 100th time and no one seems to be listening? Or do you find ways to dynamically correct their posture in ways that they are not aware of?

Have you ever considered that participants may completely understand and hear you, but that due to limitations in mobility or strength they physically just are not able to do what you are asking?

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