Post-Marathon Recovery and Survival

If you are soon running (or have just run) a Fall marathon, you have trained hard and tapered carefully for the race.   In order to stay healthy and injury-free, it is equally important for you to follow a good plan for recovery on race day and in the days and weeks following your race:
Marathon Day Post-Race Activities:

Get your Finisher Photo Taken!  You will want the finished photo as a keepsake later so take the time to wait in line and get this photo taken, even if you feel like you are just too tired.

Keep moving immediately after the race.   Keep walking slowly and/or keep standing and moving, even in line for the race photo!   You definitely don’t want to sit down and run the risk of cramping or tightening up to the point where you can’t stand up or walk.

The Magical Workout

Yes, finally there is a magical workout- it is called holistic fitness. All of your dreams to tone quickly, look perfect, feel great and be healthy can come true. Holistic fitness has been turning the heads of media, press worldwide because it is: incredible, effective, healthy and life changing. It includes the best of Aerobics, Pilates, Yoga, Primal Movements, Martial Arts, Dance, Stretching, and focuses on re-connecting you back to nature.

Holistic fitness was created by Julie Rammal. Originally the methodology was kept secret for years and used to only train Vip, Celebrities, royal families to quickly tone and get in shape. With live events, press, and the launch of the world first holistic fitness DVD: In Light Of Change, it is now available to the public.

5 Tips for Improving Posture in Your Classes (and a little science fun!)

“Stand up tall.”

“Shoulders up, back, and down.”

“Sit that butt down and back onto a chair”

How often do you find yourself saying these cues over and over in classes in order to “fix” your participant’s poor posture? Do you find yourself getting annoyed when you have said it for the 100th time and no one seems to be listening? Or do you find ways to dynamically correct their posture in ways that they are not aware of?

Have you ever considered that participants may completely understand and hear you, but that due to limitations in mobility or strength they physically just are not able to do what you are asking?

Training the Impingement Client

The shoulder is a complex joint involved with everyday activities such as reaching and sport specific movements. Evidenced based research and my clinic experience as a physical therapist, supports that shoulder impingement is a common movement dysfunction seen in men. This article will review the following about shoulder impingement:

• Pathophysiology
• Common signs and symptoms and contributing factors
• Physical therapy management
• Program design
• Exercises that are contraindicated with rationale

What Causes Lower Back Pain

Back pain is a significant problem in our country today.  Over half of all working people and at least 31 million Americans experience lower back pain at any given time. Back pain is a common health issue today that affects at least 8 out of 10 people. It is the second most frequent reason for doctor’s visits and up to 80 percent of people will experience some type of back problem in their lifetime. Eighty-six billion dollars  are spent each year treating back pain.

There are many reasons for back pain. Some of these include  overuse of the back muscles, work-related issues, sports injuries, inactivity, poor posture, prolonged sitting, obesity, poor physical conditioning, inactivity, psychological and emotional stress, and silent diseases like osteoporosis.

Hip Bursitis

Hip bursitis is mostly characterized by the inflammation of a fluid-filled sac located at the bony part of the hip bone or lateral part of the shaft of the thigh bone. The term “bursae” refers to fluid-filled sacs that are located at areas where muscles, ligaments, and tendons slide across the bones. These fluid-filled sacs act as a gliding surface, thereby preventing friction between the bones and soft tissues. More than 150 bursae are located in the human body. When any of these bursae gets inflamed, one is diagnosed with bursitis. Hip bursitis is characterized by symptoms such as pain in the outer thigh and hip area as well as a painful condition that increases friction in your joints. Stretches and strengthening decrease tightness in muscles that may be contributing to this condition. These exercises target muscles that move your leg at the hip joint. Pain might worsen due to running, walking, climbing stairs, or squatting. Incorrect posture at work or home can also cause bursitis. Bursitis is not serious in nature. It can be easily cured with proper care of the injured or inflamed area. Home remedies are enough to cure the ailment, but if it is recurring frequently, you should surely consult your doctor. Individuals affected by this condition should avoid repetitive activities that can put strain on the hip joint.  The first line of defense is rest from irritating activities. The use of painkillers or non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) might be suggested in some cases. A foam roller is also important to use before and after your activity as you find tight areas that need to be kneaded out from tightness caused from your aggravated activity.

Running Injuries 101

Running has increased in popularity. It has also increased with the average age of five years in both males and females since 1980 to 2011. The number of people finishing a marathon has gone from 1 percent of the population to 5 percent in just a few years. In 2008, more than 14 million runners completed at least 100 days running. But with the interests and increases in running, there are always possibilities for injuries. On average there are 4 injuries per 1,000 hours of running. This means that if you are running 5 to 10 hours per week, you could potentially get 2 injuries per year. This article is dedicated to eliminating or reducing them in your running journey. Most injuries occur when you are a new runner, increase your mileage more than 10 percent in a given week, or are coming back from an injury. Adding distance, using uneven work, speed, running up hills, and interval training are other reasons runners get hurt. The lower body of the hips, knees, legs, and feet are more commonly injured. In the next paragraph, common injuries will be addressed.

Preventative treatment and Rehabilitation for Plantar Fascia

The plantar fascia is a band of connecting fiber that originates at the heel and goes to the bottom of the toes. It facilitates warm-ups of balance, stability, running, walking, and cardiovascular warm-ups. Plantar fasciitis is a condition where the plantar is overstretched; it results in pain that comes from micro-tears and inflammation to the fascia. Some of the causes of plantar fasciitis include improper shoes, wear or tight ankles or calves, increasing vigorous activity more than 10% in a week, and vigorous activity such as running, jumping, or pounding on the bottom of the foot. Tight hamstrings, calves, and shins and stress placed on the plantar fasciitis cause plantar fasciitis. Some great exercises to prevent or rehabilitate the plantar fasciitis include:

Are You Ignoring Red Flags?

Maintaining shoulder health is an important part of a hockey player’s career. The risk of injury due to contact such as a body check is high and the fact that the shoulder is a very mobile joint increases the risk of non-contact injuries.

What is very interesting about the human body is how it informs us of dysfunction. Pain or discomfort in an area may actually be a referral from a different part of the body. The mistake many athletes make especially younger teenage athletes is pushing through these warning signs and not getting quality help from a hands-on therapist. In order to play through a healthy, long career in your sport you must take a preventative approach towards your Strength & Conditioning. This means being smart in how and when you train, taking adequate recovery and listening to warning signs.

Regress to Progress: Accessory Exercise for Olympic Cleans

As a U.S.A.W. Sports Performance Coach (Olympic Lifts) & also a post rehab specialist, I have the background & experience to help members improve their athletic performance while preventing injuries.

Exercise technique is paramount for all modalities of fitness but especially when doing Olympic lifts such as the clean, clean jerk and snatch. These movements are a combination of strength, timing and power. Incorporating accessory exercises for each lift will lead to noticeable gains in strength, conditioning, performance & even body composition.

One accessory exercise for the Olympic lift called the “Clean” is a barbell “balanced” front squat.
Adding this exercise will teach you how to stay upright throughout the squat, reinforce front squatting biomechanics, improve motor skills & most importantly, teaches you that the barbell rests on the front shoulders & clavicle.
Try this exercise with a practice barbell or fixed barbell that ranges from 20lbs and up. The weight should be light enough that you can catch it if it rolls off the front shoulders.

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