Training the Impingement Client

The shoulder is a complex joint involved with everyday activities such as reaching and sport specific movements. Evidenced based research and my clinic experience as a physical therapist, supports that shoulder impingement is a common movement dysfunction seen in men. This article will review the following about shoulder impingement:

• Pathophysiology
• Common signs and symptoms and contributing factors
• Physical therapy management
• Program design
• Exercises that are contraindicated with rationale

Working with the older client Part 1

According to the 2012 Census, people over the age of 65 make up almost 14% of the US population. That means there are over 43 million seniors (adults 65 or older) today, with the numbers continuing to grow, reaching 70 million by 2030. This aging population creates a unique opportunity for the fitness professional to work with. In this article, we will review the effects of aging on the musculoskeletal system, learn simple functional assessments and understand benefits of strength strengthening. In part 2, strength training guidelines and programming for common aging conditions will be discussed.

Effects of Aging on the Musculoskeletal System

The aging process involves changes to various structures and numerous systems within the body.  Research has shown that skeletal muscles change with age, specifically type II, where there is a decreased in these fibers, that atrophy over time, and a decrease in size (Brunner et al. 2007). 

The Cervical Spine – Understanding The Science Behind Both Movement And Dysfunction

The spine is a complex structure, comprised of nerves, connective tissue, bones, discs, muscles and other essential integrative components. Specifically, the cervical spine is a vulnerable area that is commonly injured due to fall, trauma, motor vehicle accident, stress, as well as poor ergonomic setups, which all lead to pain. In this article, we will review the anatomy of the neck, common injuries to the cervical spine, functional assessments and training strategies to work with clients with previous injuries.

Lumbar spine – Understanding the science behind both movement and dysfunction

The spine is a complex structure, comprised of nerves, connective tissue, bones, discs, muscles and other essential integrative components. Whether it getting out of a chair or car, lifting or carrying items, some 29 muscles around the pelvic girdle and lumbar spine, provide stability. In this article, we will review the anatomy of the spine, common injuries to the lumbar spine, functional assessments and training strategies to work with clients with previous injuries.

The Shoulder – Understanding the science behind both movement and dysfunction

The shoulder is a complex joint. That is involved in daily activities such as getting dressed or reaching into a cupboard. Because the shoulder is truly a ball and socket joint, providing it to move freely in six different motions, this makes it more susceptible to injury. In this article, we will review the anatomy of the shoulder, common injuries to the shoulder, functional assessments and training strategies to work with clients with previous shoulder injuries.

Functional Anatomy

Let’s look at two common functional tasks that everyone performs on a daily basis. The first is getting dressed. The movement of putting a shirt on, biomechanically, requires the shoulder to undergo initial horizontal adduction, elbow flexion, then shoulder abduction and external rotation. Anatomically, the posterior deltoid contracts during horizontal abduction, supraspinatus and medial deltoid abduct the shoulder, while teres minor and infraspinatus externally rotates the shoulder.

The knee complex – Understanding the science behind both movement and dysfunction

Figure 1. Dynamic sport of soccer

The foot is where movement begins, requiring mobility to perform simple functional movements. The knee however, requires stability with daily movements, but more importantly, dynamic sport movements such as soccer or football. In this article, we will review the anatomy of the knee, common injuries of the knee, functional assessments and training strategies to work with clients with previous injuries.

The Hip complex: understanding the science behind both movement and dysfunction

The foot is where movement begins requiring mobility to initiate daily and sport specific movements. However, the knee however, requires stability with daily movements, but more importantly, dynamic sport movements such as soccer or football. The hip, like the ankle, requires mobility, to perform such simple movements as sit to stand, climbing stairs and other functional movements. In this article, we will review the anatomy of the hip, common injuries to the hip, functional assessments and training strategies to work with clients with previous injuries.

The Foot and ankle complex: understanding the science behind both movement and dysfunction

The foot is where movement begins, from the initiating of simple functional movements such as sit to stand or walking, to climbing stairs, to more complex dynamic sport movements such as playing soccer, football, rugby, and tennis. The ankle and foot complex require proper mobility in order for the body to initiate movement, change direction and when on unstable surfaces, control from falling. In this article, we will review the anatomy of the ankle, common injuries to the ankle, functional assessments and training strategies to work with clients with previous injuries.

Returning to Golf after LBP: Restoring Your 
Client’s Drive without Reinjury

Background

Golf is a popular activity, particularly in the older population because it provides an opportunity to play a game that enables someone to socialize while truly enjoying the outdoors. Golf has become popular internationally, providing an activity with a low level of physical exertion over an extended period without the physical contact required in many other sports. It challenges the golfer to tackle variable obstacles in the golfer’s path such as bunkers, narrow fairways, winds and the most important goal, to drive the tiny white ball into the cup.

Injuries

Low back injuries are becoming more prevalent in the workplace, as well as in golfers.

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