Periodization and Business

Position Your Business to offer Long term packages with Principles of Periodization
“Will you paint my picture?” the lady said.

“Absolutely,” Picasso answered.

Thirty seconds later the picture was complete.

“That will be 5000 dollars,” Picasso said.

“Five thousand dollars?! It took you 30 seconds!” The lady was shocked.

“It took 30 years to learn to paint the picture in 30 seconds.”

The Language of Strength Training Program Design

Much like writing software or music, a universal language of program design is required for strength training. Trainers need to have a consistent prescription format in order for trainees to obtain consistent results. Your program may be exceptional, but a haphazard interpretation will lead to haphazard results. To remove the variability, specific training parameters must be defined. This is the system that I propose to maintain consistency among practitioners.

Strength training programs should be listed in the following manner:

Sequence. Exercise: Sets x Reps @ Tempo, Rest Interval

Training A Soccer Player: The Basics

Soccer, or football as it’s called outside of the States, is the number one sport in the world. Even in the US, soccer is the most played sport in the youth age bracket. With the growing emergence of professional soccer and the youth of yesterday playing more and more today, soccer conditioning is quickly becoming big business for trainers in the know. So how do you train a soccer player? Long distance running? Slow isolation movements in the gym? Quick short sprints? Plyometrics? The list of possibilities are endless, but the correct training protocol is not.

First, let’s look at how the game is played. A regular soccer match consists of two 45-minute halves with a 15-minute break in-between. Substitutions are less regular at the higher levels of play and like basketball, can only be made at the time the ball goes out of bounds. There are zero time outs for rest or strategy changing. The game also consists of four main position categories: forward (offense), halfback, fullback (defense), and a goalkeeper. It’s obvious to those who have played or watched a full match that different positions require different energy demands and body compositions in order to excel. Since the majority of the game is played without the ball, we will focus our discussion on training without possession and leave the ball skill up to the coaches.

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