Speed Workouts

SPEED TRAINING FOR NEWBIES
Whether you are a turtle or a rabbit, speed training is an effective method of any injury-free- based runner. First of all, runners should avoid speed training until they have run for six months or more. It is important for any kind of speed work to start with dynamic warm-ups and slow running with a rate of perceived exertion of 5 and with speed training of 7–8 out of a scale of 1–10. Start with short sets of speed training time, and once you can hit the same pace for those reps, begin to add more. Speed training can be done individually or in groups. The advantage to using a group is accountability but the negative side is that sometimes people are pushed too much. If time does not allow you to work in a group, get a schedule that includes some of the following speed training forms such as hills, stair climbing, fartlek, and tempo.

5-Week Strategy: Transitioning Into Spring Running

Spring is here! You are probably excited to get outside and run.  You may have a 5K or 10K race this spring that looks interesting to you and you are anxious to get ready for it and to do well. Depending on what you have been doing this winter, you need to be careful transitioning to spring running to avoid injury. Here are some guidelines:

If you have been running indoors all winter: 

If you live in a climate like Chicago, you have likely spent the winter running on a treadmill or track.  In this case, you need to transition carefully to running outdoors.  The running surfaces and conditions outdoors are much different in terms of their impact on your body.  To avoid injury, don’t suddenly start running outdoors.  Instead, follow this strategy:

12 Tips for Taper and Marathon Time

After a season of 12-32 weeks for a marathon, the last three weeks are geared toward tapering.  Initially, it is a relief knowing that the hard work you have gained through training is coming to an end. But also with it comes a new frustration knowing and not knowing how it will not only affect your body but also your mind.

After your final last long run, it is time to rest for your marathon.  It is perfectly normal to start to feel the aches and pains from muscles healing as you lessen your intensity, running miles after miles.  Feeling down and achy is also normal as your body adjusts to changes from training intensely.

The Benefits of Running

Runners have known for years the benefits of the sport. But as my years of running have come and gone, I see a lot of my friends still sitting on the sidelines, wondering whether or not to lace up their shoes and start running.  Running is incredibly effective at making you healthier in a number of ways.   Here are some reasons that running is actually good for you.

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