Treating Fitness Clients Like Athletes –The Right Way Part 2

In Part 1 of this series I explained how our choices affect our athletic ability throughout life and how trainers need to be careful to not apply methods designed for athletes to fitness clients who do not have an athletic background.

This time we will go over the proper use of using programming often associated with athletes for the fitness client.

I touched on the “more is better” mentality of our culture in part 1, and how it often affects our fitness and performance development negatively.

If plyometrics are good, we might as well do more of them and alternate them with five more exercises to elicit even greater responses, right? Well, hold on there Mr. Give Me All You Got trainer. You need to step back and look at what is actually appropriate for the trainee and it turns out there are actual guidelines for optimal results for things like plyometrics as well as for reps.

Treating Fitness Clients Like Athletes –The Right Way Part 1

Ever watch a kid play in the park? If you have not ever taken the time do so, find a park and try not to look too creepy. You will notice that very few kids have flexibility, mobility or stability issues. They jump off of things and start sprinting at full speed at whim. You will find these kids all look pretty athletic. Sure, some may possess more natural ability to jump higher and run faster but, provided the kid is in good shape, most kids have the same athletic ability.

As we get older, our life choices either cultivate this athleticism or hinder it. Some of us stop running around and jumping strictly for fun and restrict it to when we play organized sports while others sit in front of a computer screen or a t.v. for entertainment and get stiff, immobile and lose kinesthetic sense as the years go by.

While we may all start out as athletes, most of us definitely do not stay like that. 

Not Everything Is Appropriate

Browse

News collects all the stories you want to read